Being powerless? | 12 Step Meetings and Anonymous Groups - Part 10

Being powerless?



This topic contains 34 replies, has 0 voices, and was last updated by  Anonymous 7 years, 12 months ago.

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  • #4852568

    Anonymous

    Hey preta, nice to see you back posting again!

    @preta 2858372 wrote:

    If I had the power of choice whether or not to entertain the thought of a drink, or the power of choice to act of those thoughts before working the steps, why the hell would I bother working the program it all?

    Assuming that Dr. Bob had to use will power that first year and a half, and he was, in fact, successful… Do we assume that he exercised power of choice? And if that is true, then, could he have gone to the trouble of working the program to deal with his alcoholism… being restless irritable and discontent… being alcoholic and all? That spiritual malady, you know… Perhaps powerlessness is not the only reason to seek the spiritual solution?

    Fascinating.



    #4852590

    Anonymous

    @preta 2858372 wrote:

    I don’t really care about Dr. Bob’s experience, this is my experience…

    …If I had the power of choice whether or not to entertain the thought of a drink, or the power of choice to act of those thoughts before working the steps, why the hell would I bother working the program it all?

    Your causality is wrong. Dr. Bob took the steps and by taking the steps, especially the first ones, it allowed him to be honest and surrender to the fact that he was an alcoholic. Through an application of honesty he was able to combat those obsessive thoughts until the problem was removed. However, this required him to take Step One, along with other Steps.

    Honesty is the principle associated with Step One. With honesty we can erode away the denial, self-deception, and self-delusion.

    The purpose of the steps is to empower us, not make us powerless. It may seem paradoxical, but the way to win, is to surrender. By surrendering, we actually gain more power–power through honesty.

    You may not have anything in common with Dr. Bob, but this is not true for every alcoholic. For many alcoholics, the obsessive thoughts last for awhile and it is a process to remove them rather than just an event. In the meantime, in order to combat those obsessive thought, we attack them with honesty and surrendering (i.e. Step One). We reach out for help when we need to, but we can’t ask for help, if we are not honest about our condition.

    Now some people disagree with me and that is ok. It has been my experience that I am able to have some control over my thoughts once they enter into my head, including thoughts about drinking, but this requires honesty. There have been some really unpleasant times where I was just crawling out of my skin and without applying Step One, I probably would not have made it through those turbulent periods.

    I needed to get honest. I needed to accept the fact that once I drink, I don’t stop until I pass out or until I am out of booze. I experience the phenomena of craving that many of us do. I am also powerless over the fact that I cannot drink with impunity. My drinking leads to negative consequences, despite my best intentions, and this invites unmanageably into my life. The biggest negative consequence that I was inviting into my life was an early alcoholic death. The worst part about this death, is that the journey was filled with pain and misery–all self-inflicted.

    Once I got honest and accepted the reality of my illness, those obsessive thoughts got easier to manage. Unlike some others, the problem was removed through a process, not an event. With effort and help, I was able to get through those rough spots–the same rough spot that would have led me back to the bottle (and possibly an early grave) if I was not honest and if I did not surrender and ask for help.

    This is just my experience with Step One. Obviously, others have different experiences and that is ok.

    Mark75 wrote:
    Assuming that Dr. Bob had to use will power that first year and a half,

    It was 2 1/2 years and he was also working the program of AA during those times.



    #4852591

    Anonymous

    We admitted we were powerless over alcohol – and our lives had become unmanageable..

    For me, I had to realize first my unmanageabilities before i could honestly admit that whenever i take alcohol in my body, i can’t stop drinking and continue to oblivion. I would “hear” my mind telling me “You can quit tomorrow, so let’s drink today…” the worst part is that i continue to lie about my drinking and i couldnt see that all of my problems were caused by the effect of alcohol in me.. That’s when I’m powerless..

    Take out the alcohol, i’m still unmanageable if i continue to be an a-hole which is as someone said – the dry drunk syndrome.



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