Fear And Faith | 12 Step Meetings and Anonymous Groups - Part 3

Fear And Faith



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  • #4227430

    Anonymous

    i know very well the principle of having faith while being afraid.

    Praticed it alot in active addiction. i was very scared the first few times i tried a new drug, but i had faith that it would get me high. i was scared of buying from a new dealer, but i had faith that what they sold me could get me high. i was scared when i had to go out in public to get more, but i had faith that i would find what i wanted.

    Now i pratice the same principle in active recovery. i was very scared when i went to my first meeting, but i had faith that someone would help me. i was scared when i asked someone to sponsor me, but i had faith that the direction he gave me would work. i was scared when i took my first service committment, but i had faith that it was what i needed to do.

    As far as the quality of my life is concerned…i’ll stick with recovery!!



    #4227431

    Anonymous

    I have heard it said many many times that fear and faith cannot co-exist.

    Over the years I’ve heard a number of different takes on the ‘fear vs. faith’ stuff. And even in our literature it says that fear is the lack of faith. I’m more inclined to go along with the “lack of” position instead of believing that one eliminates the other. I actually never heard it reversed (faith is the lack of fear), but it kinda makes sense to me that when my faith is strong, my fear is weak. Can they live in the same house? IMO, they surely can! They may not be able to stand each other in the same room, though. 🙂

    My experiences vary a bit from what has been shared. For example; for me, it wasn’t faith that led me to try a new drug, seek out a new dealer, or pay my money even when nothing would be left for me. In those cases my fear was the driving force behind my behaviors – fear I’d be judged by my peers and couldn’t fit in…fear that if I didn’t take a chance with this new dealer I’d end up with nothing… or fear I’d be viewed as a cheapskate or grimy. Going to my 1st meeting wasn’t about faith for me either… I was desperate. I had no idea what to expect or what to believe. Sure, I had heard that others had found help in meetings, but I had no confidence that the same would happen for me. Asking someone to sponsor me? Hah!!! Fear of rejection was my middle name!! LOL!! At one time I was a skeptic really bad.

    I like what Jim said about faith being a verb. I’ve often heard it said, “Faith without works is dead,” or something of that nature. And along that line, I’m inclined to believe that faith is something that is acquired as a result of positive experiences (practice). If I do nothing, nothing will happen….and I’ll have no reason to believe (faith) something will happen. In order to receive help, I had to reach for it and accept it. The more I received… the more I reached… and the more I reached, the more I expected to receive. It was the expectation of a positive outcome (faith) initiated by a positive action that grew into a belief that as long as I did “the right thing for the right reasons” everything would be okay.

    So…yeah:

    “Faith is the courage that allows us to walk through the fear”

    …that sounds about right to me. LOL!! I just keep walking….



    #4227429

    vmaxrubicon
    Member

    Sometimes, or at least in AA, we talk about faith like it is something to “get.”

    I submit that faith isn’t something to get. I’ve always had faith, just faith in the wrong things. I say this about alcohol, but I’m sure any addict can relate: If you ever had a real bad day and knew that there was a bottle of booze (or whatever drug did the job for you) waiting at the end, that’s faith. So I agree with Garry that faith is the result of results, but it isn’t something I had to get because I already had it.

    So faith isn’t something to aquire or learn. It is inborn, it is a natural human capacity. In fact, it is a gift. And, to quote Bill Wilson, it is our greatest gift and sharing that gift with others is our greatest responsibility.

    Peace,
    Jim



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